Interesting

LVG B.I

LVG B.I

LVG B.I

The LVG B.I was the most important German reconnaissance aircraft at the start of the First World War, and remained a significant aircraft for most of 1915 before being replaced by more modern designs.

The Luft Verkehrs Gesellschaft AG (LVG) was originally an airship firm, operating an air traffic service from the Johannisthal airfield at Berlin (the name translates as Air Traffic Company). The company soon moved into heavier than air vehicles, starting with a number Farman pushers.

The B.I was designed by Franz Schneider, a Swiss engineer who had worked for Edouard Nieuport in France. After a short but successful career Nieuport was killed in an air crash on 15 September 1911. Schneider's first designs for LVG were copies of the Nieuport monoplanes (company designations LVG E I to E VI), but these failed to attract military orders and so Schneider began work on the sort of two-seat biplane that the German army favoured at the time.

Work on the B.I began in 1912 and the new biplane was under construction by February 1913. LVG gave their aircraft E or D designations, for monoplanes and biplanes (eindecker or dreidecker). D.I to D.III were Farman pusher types. Schneider's new aircraft had the company designation LVG D.IV. Later in the war LVG used Arabic numerals, as in the D 10 biplane fighter, presumably in order to avoid confusion with the military designations. In 1913 the German air force called the D.IV the LVG B, and availability reports refer to the type as the B, the B/13 and the B.I.

The B.I was an unequal span two-seat biplane. The wings were designed so that they could easily be folded back against the fuselage without having to remove the wing bracing. This was done in order to make the aircraft easier to move by road. The wings were straight edged and of equal chord, and slightly swept-back. The shorter lower wing had straight ends, the upper wing had tapered ends.

The most unusual feature of the B.I was the 'cranked' ailerons. These were made up of two sections installed at slightly different angles (higher angle on the outside, lower angle on the inside), with a connecting section. These were also designed by Schneider, and the idea was that either the high or low section would be in the airflow at all times. Contemporary pilots reported that these ailerons made the aircraft very stable in turbulent air, and also made the controls easier to use. They were used on every LVG design up to and including the C.IV.

The tail was a fairly typical early model - the fixed surfaces were shallow triangles with small control surfaces on the end.

The aircraft was mainly wooden, with four spruce longerons in the fuselage and spruce spars in the wings. Both were wire-braced internally. Both wings and fuselage were fabric covered. There was a metal panel above the engine, which stretched back to the two cockpits. The tail was built around 20mm steel tubes.

The Mercedes D I engine was carried in a simple mount on the nose, with the cylinder block visible above the fuselage. Some aircraft used a 110hp Benz engine.

As was the case with most early observation aircraft the observer sat in the front cockpit, and was in command of the aircraft, while the pilot sat in the rear cockpit.

The B.I was an immediate success. The German Fliegertruppe considered it to be better than the Albatros biplanes with better handling characteristics. The Fliegertruppe purchased eight B.Is in the spring of 1913. One of these aircraft was used to fly from Berlin to Breslau in April 1913 and after that was approved for officer training. More orders were placed during 1913, and the B.I played a major part in the 1913 Kaiser Manöver Army exercises. Later in 1913 a B.I broke the world endurance record, staying in the air for nine and a half hours. By the end of 1913 the Army had ordered 112 B.Is, although twenty four of these were built under licence by Euler and were so changed that they became known as the Euler B.I.

The B.I took part in a number of pre-war sporting events. In May 1914 four took part in the nine-day Prinz Heinrich Flug, and came first, second, third and eighth (out of 25). The type did even better in the Ostmarkenflug of June 1914, filling seven of the top eight positions (missing fifth).

Before the First World War the German Army wasn't a single organisation. Bavarian had its own armed services, and in January 1914 the Bavarian Fliegertruppe ordered its first six B.Is. The type entered licensed production with the Gustav Otto Flugmaschinenwerke of Munich, and by the outbreak of war the Bavarian air force had 24 LVG B.Is on its strength. The exact number of aircraft produced by Otto is unclear, but was probably around 125-130 before common serial numbers were introduced across German service and 170-175 in total. LVG built another 400-450 for an estimated total of 570-635 aircraft.

The B.I was already in service at the start of the First World War. Eighty-four were recorded at the front on 31 August 1914. Numbers peaked on 30 April 1915, when 174 were reported, and there were still 101 at the front on 31 August. After that the number of B.Is in service dropped quickly, to 39 by 31 October and only seven by 28 February 1916. The B.I was replaced in service by the improved LVG B.II and by various Albatros B types.

The B.I served as a reconnaissance aircraft in 1914-1915. After that it went on to serve as a training aircraft. The same happened to the slightly improved LVG B.II, and in 1917 the type was put back into production as the more robust LVG B.III.

The LVG B.I also saw service in the Ottoman Empire.

Engine: Mercedes D.I inline engine
Power: 100hp
Crew: 2
Span: 47ft 8.5in
Length: 25ft 7.5in
Height: 10ft 6in
Empty Weight: 1,683lb
Loaded Weight: 2,490lb
Maximum Speed: 62.5mph
Climb rate: 14min to 800m

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


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Rise and Fall of the Eagle of Lille

It didn’t take long for Ensign Max Immelmann of the Imperial German Flying Corps, piloting unarmed two- seater reconnaissance planes over the Western Front, to learn that the enemy was shooting more than photographs. The Farman MF.11 diving at him during a June 1915 mission was already obsolete. Immelmann’s LVG B.I was a generation ahead— sleeker, faster, more powerful, higher flying. But the Farman had one thing the LVG didn’t: a machine gun.

“Suddenly I heard the familiar tack tack tack tack…and saw little holes appear in our right wing,” recalled Immelmann, who held course for his observer to finish his photography until the enemy’s bullets began striking metal.“If the brute shoots up my engine, there is nothing more to be done!”

Diving away, the German pilot nursed the LVG home to Douai. Squadron mates found one round had gone completely through its engine bed and another had nicked the main fuselage spar had it broken, the whole plane would have folded up in midair. For saving his aircraft, Immelmann received the Iron Cross 2nd Class. He had also learned an important lesson: “It is a horrible feeling to have to wait until one is perhaps hit, without being able to fire a shot oneself!”

Max Immelmann was used to learning the hard way. His father, a Dresden manufacturer, died when he was just 7. His mother raised him to be a vegetarian, nonsmoking teetotaler. A squadron mate later recalled that “in the field he did eat meat, although his real love was ‘mountains of excellent cake’ which he bit into each afternoon.” Such habits did not necessarily endear Immelmann to fellow fliers. His best friend may have been his gray German mastiff Tyras, who slept in his master’s bed.“Of course the brave doggie must go to war with me, and he’s already delighted with the idea!” he wrote home in the first weeks of the war. “He has got a label on his collar, inscribed: ‘War Dog.’”

His letters also show an early affinity for a fellow Saxon in Feldflieger Abteilung (Flying Section) 62. Eight months younger than Immelmann, 24-year-old Lieutenant Oswald Boelcke was by that time a veteran of more than 50 missions who had already received the Iron Cross 2nd Class.“We suit one another very well,” Immelmann wrote.“[Neither] of us smoke, and we practically never touch alcohol….He has been flying since the beginning of the war and spent a long time at the front.”

In July 1915, when FFA 62 got its first armed two-seater, an LVG C.I with a Parabellum MG14 for the observer, it was assigned to Boelcke. Immelmann and his backseater mounted a captured French machine gun on their LVG. “Although my ‘auxiliary fighter’ is only a makeshift, at least my observer can rattle away with his gun, and that makes a permanent impression on the French,” he wrote. “In the machines I flew previously a speedy retreat was the best means of defense against enemy airmen. Things are going to be different now.”

On July 4, Boelcke and his observer scored the section’s first kill, a Morane-Saulnier L two-seat Parasol monoplane. Later that month the squadron took delivery of a pair of new Fokker E.I Eindecker single-seat scouts. No mere weapon-hauler, the Fokker had a machine gun fixed to the cowling and synchronized to fire between the prop blades. “These little craft absorb my entire interest,” Immelmann enthused. “They are pretty machines, and they are light, speedy and nimble. The pilot flies alone. The machine is designed solely for fighting enemy airmen, and not reconnaissance work.”

He practiced his gunnery using ground targets until August 1, when British B.E.2c bombers hit Douai at dawn. Boelcke was first to take off in pursuit, with Immelmann hot on his tail. “There were at least ten enemy machines in the air,” Immelmann recalled. “Suddenly I saw Boelcke go down in a steep dive. As I learnt later, he had a bad gun stoppage, so that he couldn’t fire a shot.” Boelcke could only return to Douai at that point, where he warned everyone, “They will shoot our Immelmann dead!”

Meanwhile Immelmann had caught up with a B.E.2c halfway back to Arras. “I dived on him and fired my machine gun,” he recounted. “For a moment I thought I was going to fly right into him.” Canadian pilot Lieutenant William Reid, having used his observer’s seat to store bombs, had only a handgun to defend himself. Immelmann’s machine gun repeatedly jammed, and he had to use both hands to clear it, even as he maneuvered to cut off Reid’s escape and dodge enemy fire. The men at Douai watched the whole thing. Immelmann said they later told him that “my turns and glides and my flying in general looked as if I had been in a Fokker for weeks instead of three days.”

After some 10 minutes and 500 rounds, Immelmann’s gun either failed completely or simply ran dry. Reid, wounded, coasted down behind German lines, and Immelmann landed to take him prisoner. Awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class for his victory, he took advantage of his newly won prestige to write Tony Fokker, claiming precedence over Boelcke in receiving the first new E.II Eindecker. The two friends had become rivals.

It took Boelcke more than two weeks to get his second kill, but Immelmann needed only a week after that to catch up. While the two were flying an evening patrol over the lines on August 26, “Suddenly I saw an Allied biplane attack Boelcke from behind,” Immelmann wrote. “Boelcke did not seem to have seen him.”

Immelmann broke up the enemy’s pass, and Boelcke came around. “First he came into Boelcke’s sights, and then into mine, and finally we both went for him….Boelcke’s gun appeared to have jammed, but I fired 300 rounds.”The enemy pilot threw up both arms and Immelmann saw his helmet come off, just before the plane plummeted 7,200 feet to the ground.

Boelcke returned the favor on September 9, shooting a Morane-Saulnier off Immelmann’s tail for his third victory. In those early days of aerial combat, these were likely the first recorded instances of leader/wingman tactics. But who was the leader, and who was the wingman?

By the end of October, Immelmann had scored his fifth victory, a Vickers F.B.5 “Gun Bus,” and had been mentioned in military communiqués. “Now I shall no longer object to being written up in the papers, since I have seen how everyone at home follows my successes,” he wrote. His enjoyment of his newfound fame was spoiled only by the fact that Boelcke still ran neck and neck with him.“He claims to have shot down five enemy machines, but one of them landed on its own territory,” groused Immelmann. “If I counted all those, I should have at least seven.”

By January 1916, Immelmann had seven victories confirmed. On the morning of the 12th he dived head-on at a Gun Bus about 9,000 feet above Bapaume. The initial pass devolved into a turning fight in which the Eindecker had the upper hand. Immelmann put more than 100 rounds into the Vickers when “All of a sudden a reddish yellow flame shot out from his engine, leaving a long trail of smoke behind him.”

Though he was wounded and his observer dead, British pilot 2nd Lt. Herbert Thomas Kemp managed to land his ship and jump clear. Immelmann set down nearby, and the two of them watched the Vickers burn. “You are Immelmann?” Kemp asked him. “You are well known to us. Your victory today is another fine sporting success for you.”

If Immelmann then fancied himself the top German ace, it was only until his return to Douai, where he learned Boelcke had also scored his eighth shootdown at almost the same hour. Nonetheless, he commented, “I was never so pleased at one of Boelcke’s victories as I was that day.”

At mess the section commander announced, “His Majesty the Emperor has been graciously pleased to confer the highest war order, the ‘Pour le Mérite,’ on the two victors in aerial warfare.” Immelmann and Boelcke were the first aviators and junior officers so honored, and on the same day. (The story goes that Immelmann was decorated first, which is why the Orden Pour le Mérite isn’t nicknamed the “Blue Oswald.”) To top it off, a few days later Immelmann received a new E.IV Eindecker—bigger and heavier, with a twin-row 160-hp Oberursel radial engine. He was now one of the world’s top-scoring fighter pilots, flying the world’s top combat aircraft.

Boelcke, whose fame would eventually rest on his Dicta, the rules of air combat and unit tactics that he authored, would subsequently do much of his fighting against the French over Metz and Verdun. The air war against the British, over Lille, fell almost solely to Immelmann and his Eindecker. More of a loner, Immelmann gained notoriety because he was feared, though he seems to have been an indifferent shot and, in a dogfight, not so much skilled as persistent. He once wrote, “I do not employ any tricks when I attack,” and never claimed to have performed the “Immelmann turn,” much less ever took credit for it. A climbing half loop with a roll-out at the top (but in the low-powered planes of the day, probably more of a wingover), the maneuver may have been named after Immelmann by British pilots. He and Boelcke led the “Fokker Scourge,” making “Fokker Fodder” of Allied airmen, but since he scored no confirmed kills from early January through early March 1916, it could be said that Immelmann, the “Eagle of Lille,” owned his piece of the sky thanks largely to reputation.

“[Enemy airplanes] never come to Douai now, except sometimes in formations of ten,” he wrote in early February. “It has been said in the House of Commons and in a French meeting that the supremacy of the air is no longer in the hands of the French or English.”

“Until the Royal Flying Corps is in possession of a machine as good or better as the Fokker,” proclaimed British headquarters, “it seems a change in the tactics employed becomes necessary.” Meanwhile, however, Immelmann and Boelcke were discovering that the Fokker E.IV was, if more robust, inferior overall to the E.III. Twice the cylinders meant twice the weight, twice the unreliability and twice the torque effect on maneuverability, but not twice the performance.

Flying above the lines on March 2, Immelmann had to dive away from an attacking Morane-Saulnier L two-seater, which was escorted by a Morane-Saulnier N monoplane with its own forward-firing gun, flown by Sergeant Toné Bayetto. Unable to overtake them as they flew uncontested right over Douai, the Eagle of Lille “considered whether it would not be better for me to land, for I could simply do nothing with my engine.” He settled on cutting off the enemy’s retreat. As he put it, “Then the fun began.” Bayetto plunged to the attack. Dodging, Immelmann forced the two-seater down, but reported: “I could not make up the lost 500 meters of height with my bad engine and secondly I had a gun jam. So I let the monoplane buzz off in the direction of Lille and went home.”

Nevertheless, that March was the Eagle’s best month. He scored five victories, including a Bristol Scout around noon on the 13th and a B.E.2c that evening, his first double.

A fellow pilot recalled: “At first, he was not pretentious. Later, after receiving many orders, he became a bit vain….He loved to have himself photographed each time he got a new medal.” Immelmann’s squadron mates began addressing him as “your exalted Majesty.” Still Boelcke kept pace. By month’s end their scores stood even, at 13.

Immelmann’s E.IV boasted twin machine guns, which was fortunate for him, as he needed every advantage against new British planes and tactics. Two days after Easter he took on a pair of the new Airco D.H.2 pusher biplanes of No. 24 Squadron, the Royal Flying Corps’ first all-fighter unit. He started out with a height advantage, but quickly found himself hard-pressed: “The two worked splendidly together in the course of the fight and put eleven shots into my machine. The petrol tank, the struts on the fuselage, the undercarriage and the propeller were hit. I could only save myself by a nose-dive of 1,000 meters. Then at last the two left me alone. It was not a nice business.”

Fellow pilots noted their ace had by this time lost some of the spring in his step, one writing he’d become “a bundle of nerves lately.” Immelmann also fell behind in his letter writing, and only secondhand accounts survive of his final weeks.

On the last day of May, leading three Eindeckers against seven Vickers between Bapaume and Cambrai, Immelmann had let off a long burst of fire when his E.IV began vibrating, almost out of control. He cut the fuel and ignition and, as the 14-cylinder rotary spun down, saw that his interrupter gear had malfunctioned. Half a prop blade was gone, sawed off by his own guns, and the lopsided prop had shaken the Oberursel almost out of its nacelle. He barely managed to crash-land. It was no isolated incident while testing a three-gun E.IV, Tony Fokker himself almost shot off his own prop.

With the Allies deploying dedicated fighter units, Immelmann and Boelcke undertook— against opposition from their superiors—to have Germany follow suit. Immelmann, now a triple ace, was tapped to lead one of the first Jagdstaffeln (fighter squadrons), but it was not to be.

Late on the afternoon of Sunday, June 18, Immelmann led four Eindeckers in pursuit of four British F.E.2b two-seat pushers of No. 25 Squadron. With one machine gun firing forward and another mounted high to fire backward over the upper wing and prop, the “Fee” was no easy prey. Immelmann succeeded in forcing one down near Arras, but only after his E.IV took serious hits to its struts and wings. It was still undergoing repairs at dusk when 25 Squadron sent another flight over the lines. In a fateful decision, Immelmann followed his men up in a reserve E.III.

A major dogfight had developed high above Loos. Four of Immelmann’s squadron mates were mixing it up with four Fees. To the northeast, two Fokkers were tangling with four British planes, with two more Eindeckers hurrying toward them to even things up. Adding to the confusion, German flak batteries were pumping shells into the melee.

Shooting off a white flare to signal the antiaircraft guns to hold their fire, the Eagle of Lille plunged to attack an F.E.2b, rattling off a long stream of shots. His 17th victory fell away in a steep dive, to land behind German lines with its pilot mortally wounded.

Another Fee came down behind Immelmann. Pilot 2nd Lt. G.R. McCubbin reported: “By this time I was very close to the Fokker and he apparently realized we were on his tail, and he immediately started to do what I expect was the beginning of an ‘Immelmann’ turn. As he started to turn we opened fire.” Observer Corporal J.H. Waller let go a burst from his forward Lewis gun as Immelmann’s Eindecker crossed their nose. “The Fokker immediately got out of control,” recounted McCubbin, “and went down to earth.”

One of Immelmann’s squadron mates testified his leader attempted to climb as if to rejoin the fight, but something clearly wasn’t right. The Fokker pitched up and stalled over its left wing, bucking and flapping. Witnesses saw the E.III’s fuselage break off behind the cockpit, and both wings tore away as it began its death dive. The engine and cockpit fell more than a mile. Immelmann’s remains were recognized only by his monogrammed kerchief and the Blue Max at his throat.

He was one of the first great aces to die in combat, and Germany struggled to come to grips with his loss. Experts claimed his Eindecker had been hit by friendly anti-aircraft fire, or that his interrupter gear had malfunctioned again (one of the prop blades appeared to be sawed off), that the less-sturdy E.III had been unable to withstand the resultant shaking—anything but admit their hero had fallen to the enemy.

For their part, the British simply credited the kill to McCubbin and Waller. “It is quite on the cards that our bullets not only got him, but his prop as well,” commented Waller.

“Immelmann lost his life by a silly chance,” declared Boelcke, who was transferred to the Eastern Front to spare his country another such loss. Within the year he would raise his score to 40, only to die in a midair collision with one of his own men.

Even more than Boelcke, Immelmann has come to be identified with the Fokker Eindecker, in which he rose and fell. Perhaps he had just been lucky to fly it during its brief supremacy, but then so did many men, without achieving as much.

“He had it much more difficult than later fighter pilots,” a squadron mate recalled of Max Immelmann after the war,“…because in 1915-16 there was much less aerial activity. His number of victories was not as large…but they were harder earned.”

Among Don Hollway’s many previous contributions is a story about French WWI ace Jean Navarre (November 2012). Further reading: Immelmann: The Eagle of Lille, by Frantz Immelmann and Early German Aces of World War 1, by Greg VanWyngarden. See more photos at donhollway. com/immelmann.

Originally published in the November 2013 issue of Aviation History. To subscribe, click here.


During the years of 1965 and 1982, Lourens van Geest and his father, Ivo Jan van Geest, owned a cut flower production farm in Naaldwijk, in the Westland, Netherlands. They specialised in growing carnations, freesia and lillies. Then in 1983, the nursery was sold and Lourens van Geest emigrated to South Africa with his wife and children to work for Pieter Toxopeus, buying cut flowers for Flower World florists at the Multiflora auction in Johannesburg.

Just two years later in 1985, Pieter Toxopeus and Lourens van Geest started LVG Plants (Lourens Van Geest) supplying pot plants to nurseries and retail stores with production facilities in Muldersdrift, Rustenburg, Natal and Venda. Lourens oversaw production for all these sites for many years. A decade on and the van Geest family purchased 100% of the shares in LVG Plants, and rented production space in Muldersdrift.

LVG Plants made history when in 1996 they built the first 5000 m² greenhouse in Oaktree, Krugersdorp. Three years on, LVG Plants and Peba House Plants started a joint venture, Plantimex in Heuningklip. Through Plantimex, both family farms and other fellow industry suppliers were able to offer a complete range of products to nurseries and retail.

To centralize production, a space spanning 40.000 m² was completed in Oaktree and work shifted from Muldersdrift in 2004. For a solid decade, growth bloomed and further production space expanded. Then in 2014, LVG Plants purchased 100% of the shares in Plantimex and sales and distribution offices moved to the LVG Plants premises.

Not more than a year later in 2015, LVG Plants built the largest solar thermal plant in the Southern Hemisphere. Sadly, a massive tornado swept through Krugersdorp in October 2017, critically striking LVG Plant in its path. With it, 30.000 m² worth of greenhouses and production was destroyed. Rebuilding was started and completed by June 2018, adding further production space to a grand total 110.000m².

With much growth and regrowth, LVG Plants proudly celebrated its 35 year anniversary in 2020.


LVG B.I to B.III

The LVG aircraft type B.I to B.III were two-seat reconnaissance and training aircraft of the German Air Force and were used at the beginning of the First World War on German and later on the Bulgarian side.

Development and construction:

The development of the LVG type B aircraft began in 1912 by the engineer Franz Schneider, who previously moved from the manufacturer Nieuport to the german Luftverkehrsgesellschaft (LVG).

The first aircraft was developed under the name D.IV 1912 and produced from 1913. The two-story biplane was initially designed as a training aircraft, but was used in the military field as a reconnaissance aircraft.

Already at the beginning of the war, the model B.I proved to be completely inadequate for military use, since it was neither armed nor had sufficient armor. The successor model, the B.II was built a bit smaller overall, but had in the first phase of production still the same engine as the B.I installed. Only in the course of time, this was replaced by a slightly stronger engine, but even with this, the aircraft could not meet expectations.

Based on the experience of the two models B.I and B.II, the B.III was built from the beginning only as a training aircraft and delivered from 1917.

Use in the First World War:

At the beginning of the war, Type B.I aircraft were used as reconnaissance aircraft on the Western Front. However, it quickly became apparent that these did not meet the military requirements. Although the successor model B.II was quickly produced and delivered, but since this aircraft was also too weak, both types were gradually withdrawn from the front during 1915 and served as training aircraft.

Some aircraft were still sold to the Bulgarian Air Force at the end of 1915 and served there until the end of the war.

Technical specifications:

Designation: LVG B.I
Country: German Empire
Typ: Reconnaissance plane
Length: 9,25 meters
Span: 14 meters
Height: 3,2 meters
Mass: 780kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: Water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Benz or Mercedes D.I 105PS
Maximum speed: 100 km/h
Reach: 540 kilometers
Armament: none

Designation: LVG B.II
Country: German Empire
Typ: Reconnaissance plane
Length: 8,30 meters
Span: 12,12 meters
Height: 3,2 meters
Mass: 726kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: Water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Mercedes D.II 120PS
Maximum speed: 110 km/h
Reach: 440 kilometers
Armament: none

Designation: LVG B.III
Country: German Empire
Typ: Training aircraft
Length: 7,89 meters
Span: 12,51 meters
Height: 2,89 meters
Mass: 710kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: Water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Mercedes D.II 120PS
Maximum speed: 120 km/h
Reach: 300 kilometers
Armament: none

You can find the right literature here:

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces) Paperback – Bargain Price, August 25, 2001

Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21)

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21) Paperback – February 16, 2016

This book describes and illustrates the development of Friedrichshafen aircraft of WWI with text, 540 photos, 18 in color, 37 color profiles, production quantities and serial numbers of aircraft, and aircraft dimensions and performance specifications. In addition, there are 26 official SVK drawings and 11 aircraft are illustrated in scale drawings to 1/48 (4) or 1/72 (7) scales. The book has 312 pages and is of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and modelers alike.

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918 Paperback – December 15, 2010

Much has been written about the British aircraft of the First World War, but little has surfaced about the aircraft of the Axis powers, Germany and Austria. Here, Terry C. Treadwell tells the story of the aircraft from companies such as Fokker, builder of the famous triplane, as fl own by Baron von Richthofen's Flying Circus, AEG, Albatros, Junkers and Hansa. From reconnaissance aircraft to state-of-the-art bombers that could reach London, this is the definitive guide to aircraft of the Axis powers during the First World War. The aircraft are explained in detail and a history of each company is provided, making this an excellent source book for aircraft enthusiasts, model makers and those interested in the air war over the trenches of France and Belgium, as well as further afield in the Italian campaign.

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division Hardcover – January 9, 1997

The standard reference now revised and expanded. Dr. Robinson has opened up his vast photo archives to enhance this new edition of his classic work. Much of the new photographic material is published here for the first time.


LVG B.I - History

Supporting A Vibrant Community

A BRIEF HISTORY OF LONGWOOD VILLAGE GROUP

The Constitution of the Longwood Village Group was adopted at its first Annual General Meeting on the 15th May 2000.

The charity was registered with the Charity Commission (Registered charity number 1087328) and the following people were elected to serve as charity trustees.

The main objectives of the Longwood Village Group are to advance education and provide facilities in the interests of social welfare for recreation and leisure time occupation so as to improve the conditions of life for the inhabitants of Longwood and the Neighbourhood.

Another Charity in existence at the time, called The Longwood Community Association, held The Longwood Mechanics Hall in Trust for the people of Longwood and was attempting to secure grant money to refurbish and reinstate the building as a community centre for the people of Longwood.

After several attempts to secure grants failed the Longwood Community Association went in to decline and eventually after an extraordinary General Meeting on the 31st August 2007 the charity was dissolved and the four remaining trustees handed over the keys to The Mechanics Hall to the Trustees of Longwood Village Group who took over the task of trying to raise funds for its refurbishment.

Shortly after, Derek and Alison Fairbank were appointed as Voluntary Hall Managers and took on the task of applying for grants and seeking assistance from various sources in an effort to secure the future of the hall as a thriving community centre.

The appointment of Derek and Alison proved to be a major turning point in the fortunes of the Hall, from that moment onward there have been continuous successes in obtaining grant moneys and here is a list, in chronological order, of the major improvements that have been accomplished at the hall to date:-

Total refurbishment of the library room replacement of all the old books with donated paper back books which are on sale to the public to raise money for future projects

Refurbishment of the toilet facilities with the inclusion of a wheel chair accessible toilet and the provision on water heating systems so that hot water is available in all the toilets.

Opening out of the school room and installation of a quality dance floor and floor to ceiling mirrors.

Refurbishment and redecoration of the art room with replacement of the windows with double glazed units.

Refurbishment of the stage and the installation of new stage lighting.

Demolition of the old wooden porch and the construction of a new porch with an access ramp

The installation of a lift from the hall down to the lower level.

Complete stripping out of the "kitchen" down stairs, rebuilding of the floor, recladding of the walls and the fitting out of the room with modern kitchen appliances, re-glazing of all the windows with double glazed units.

Installation of a central heating system throughout the hall run from a combi boiler that also provides instant hot water to the sinks in the hall and the downstairs kitchen.

Refurbishment of one of the downstairs rooms so as to provide a store room.

Opening up of the arches of the hall windows and replacement of all the glazing with modern double glazed units.

There have also been numerous successes in obtaining funding to provide equipment for the hall such as Table Tennis Tables, Pool Table, Wii games console, projector and screen, air hockey game, indoor bowling mat and bowling balls, indoor curling equipment, numerous board games such as scrabble, rumikub, dominoes and triominoes.

More recently the Hall has been repainted, a new CCTV security system and fire alarm system has been installed with smoke detectors in all rooms and the old boiler has been replaced with a new more powerful but more energy efficient boiler.

The Hall is currently in use approximately 80% to 85% of the available opening time but is available for hire for "one off" events such as birthday parties, anniversaries, retirement parties and even wedding breakfasts and funeral teas.

If you would like further details with regard to hiring the hall and any of its facilities just get in touch.


LVG C.I and succession aircraft

With the first Allied fighters on the Western Front began in 1915, the Luftverkehrsgesellschaft (LVG) to arm their reconnaissance aircraft and produced the LVG C.I. In the next few years, the development led to the successful C.V and C.VI models, which were used on all fronts.

Development and construction:

Already in October 1914 appeared on the Western Front, the first armed aircraft of the Allies, who acted very successfully against the unarmed German reconnaissance aircraft. The German pilots then demanded from their military leadership that their aircraft should also be armed.

The aircraft manufacturers began thus with the development of appropriate airplanes, whereby the first airplanes were only enlighteners of the category B and on these a machine gun was mounted.

For this reason, the chief engineer Franz Schneider initially took a LVG B.I at the airline and fitted a ring carriage around the observer's seat so that the machine gun could be swiveled. This technique was used a short time later as a standard for the subsequent aircraft not only by the airline but also by other companies. Shortly after the beginning of the production of the LVG C.I these airplanes were already brought to the front to replace the until then used unarmed reconnaissance aircraft.

By the same principle, the LVG B.II was converted to the LVG C.II. In this model, however, the pilot and the observer exchanged places, so the pilot now sat in front. It was again mounted on the ring mount rotatable machine gun, later produced aircraft also added the synchronized machine gun for the pilot.

From the LVG C.III only three prototypes were built. The pilot sat back in the back and the aircraft was a bit smaller overall than the predecessor.

The LVG C.IV was initially intended as a remote reconnaissance. But the plane was larger than the C.II, had a fully faired engine and modified control surfaces. Since the prototypes were subjected to strong engine vibration, three more engines were tested, but the result was not satisfactory. Therefore, only a few aircraft of this type were built. For the chief engineer Franz Schneider this was also the last airplane he had developed at the company. Due to the lack of success, he was subsequently dismissed and Willi Sabersky-Müssigbrodt enlisted by Deutsche Flugzeug-Werke GmbH.

Thanks to the experience of Sabersky-Müssigbrodt on the design of the DFW C.V, the engineer was able to bring this into the development of the LVG C.V and with the 200 hp Benz Bz.IVü this time a reliable engine was available. The acceptance of the prototype on December 24, 1916 went so well that the German army ordered 1,250 aircraft.

Since the C.V was a rather large aircraft in terms of dimensions, the development of the C.VI was particularly careful to make the aircraft more compact and more aerodynamic. By a higher-built fuselage, a better-clad engine, a propeller hood and larger side and height control, the specification could be met. From March 1918 could be started with the production.

From the aircraft LVG C.VII and LVG C.VIII only prototypes were built. Due to the capitulation of the German Empire, no other aircraft of this type were built.

Use in the First World War:

The LVG C.I was intended from the beginning only as a temporary solution for use in war. The LVG C.II, however, proved to be a very good reconnaissance aircraft and was used by the German army until 1917. With one of these aircraft was carried out on November 28, 1916, the first bombing raid on London. The C.II was also used successfully by the Luftwaffe Austria-Hungary.

The LVG C.V and C.VI turned out to be particularly reliable and successful. Both aircraft were used for reconnaissance and artillery observation missions, bomber flights and aerial reconnaissance and were among the best German aircraft.

Technical specifications:

Designation: LVG C.I
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 8,61 meters
Span: 14,5 meters
Height: 3,2 meters
Mass: 835kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Benz Bz III 150 PS
Maximum speed: 125 km/h
Reach: 300 kilometers
Armament: 1 machine gun 7,92 mm Parabellum and up to 40Kg bombs
Designation: LVG C.II
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 8,1 meters
Span: 12,85 meters
Height: 2,93 meters
Mass: 845kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Mercedes D III 160 PS
Maximum speed: 130 km/h
Reach: 440 kilometers
Armament: 1 to 2 machine guns 7,92mm Parabellum and up to 100kg bombs

Designation: LVG C.IV
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 8,5 meters
Span: 13,6 meters
Height: 3,1 meters
Mass: 1050kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Mercedes D IV 220 PS
Maximum speed: unknown
Reach: unknown
Armament: 2 machine guns 7,92mm Parabellum and up to 70Kg bombs

Designation: LVG C.V
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 8,07 meters
Span: 13,62 meters
Height: 3,2 meters
Mass: 985kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Benz Bz.IV, 200 PS
Maximum speed: 165 km/h
Reach: 485 kilometers
Armament: 2 machine guns 7,92 mm Parabellum

Designation: LVG C.VI
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 7,45 meters
Span: unknown
Height: 2,8 meters
Mass: 930kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: water-cooled 6-cylinder in-line engine Benz Bz.IV, 200 PS
Maximum speed: 170 km/h
Reach: 400 kilometers
Armament: 2 machine guns 7,92 mm Parabellum and up to 115Kg bombs

You can find the right literature here:

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces) Paperback – Bargain Price, August 25, 2001

Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21)

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21) Paperback – February 16, 2016

This book describes and illustrates the development of Friedrichshafen aircraft of WWI with text, 540 photos, 18 in color, 37 color profiles, production quantities and serial numbers of aircraft, and aircraft dimensions and performance specifications. In addition, there are 26 official SVK drawings and 11 aircraft are illustrated in scale drawings to 1/48 (4) or 1/72 (7) scales. The book has 312 pages and is of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and modelers alike.

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918 Paperback – December 15, 2010

Much has been written about the British aircraft of the First World War, but little has surfaced about the aircraft of the Axis powers, Germany and Austria. Here, Terry C. Treadwell tells the story of the aircraft from companies such as Fokker, builder of the famous triplane, as fl own by Baron von Richthofen's Flying Circus, AEG, Albatros, Junkers and Hansa. From reconnaissance aircraft to state-of-the-art bombers that could reach London, this is the definitive guide to aircraft of the Axis powers during the First World War. The aircraft are explained in detail and a history of each company is provided, making this an excellent source book for aircraft enthusiasts, model makers and those interested in the air war over the trenches of France and Belgium, as well as further afield in the Italian campaign.

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division Hardcover – January 9, 1997

The standard reference now revised and expanded. Dr. Robinson has opened up his vast photo archives to enhance this new edition of his classic work. Much of the new photographic material is published here for the first time.


Specifications (B.I)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2 (pilot, observer)
  • Length: 8.30 m (27 ft 2¾ in)
  • Wingspan: 12.12 m (39 ft 9¼ in)
  • Height: 2.95 m (9 ft 8¼ in)
  • Wing area: 35.40 m² (381.05 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 726 kg (1,600 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,075 kg (2,370 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.I inline piston engine, 75 kW (100 hp)

LVG B.I - History

A photo, I believe of a Aviatik B.I B.111/14 at :

HISTORY SUPER SELTEN FOTOS WK 1 FLIEGER 1917 | eBay (http://www.ebay.de/itm/HISTORY-SUPER-SELTEN-FOTOS-WK-1-FLIEGER-1917-/380830571335?pt=Militaria&hash=item58ab455b47)

Thanks for the reply. If a LVG B.I so could be either B.111/13 or B.111/15. Any thoughts on year? The reason I identified the aircraft as an Aviatik B.I is primarily because B.111/14 fits for an Aviatik.

I believe it was fairly common in training units to use larger versions of the aircraft's serial number as shown on both this aircraft and the same seller's B.65/?? I assume that with the location given as Lechfeld these aircraft may belong to bMFS 4.

Flieger Flugzeug Roulers Roeselare Feldflieger Flandern Flandres 4. Armee | eBay (http://www.ebay.de/itm/Flieger-Flugzeug-Roulers-Roeselare-Feldflieger-Flandern-Flandres-4-Armee-/171277270048?pt=Militaria&hash=item27e0ebbc20)

ia photograph of what I believe to be Aviatik B.I 90/14. In my database I already have B.90/14 down as this type and serving with FFA 6 (as per sellers information) as there is a photograph in Propellerblatt 5 P.200. Not sure if it is the same photo as my collection currently in storage.


Watch the video: Swiss LVG (January 2022).