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Admiral W. S Sims - History

Admiral W. S Sims - History


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Admiral W. S. Sims

For biography see Sims (DD-409)

(AP-127: dp. 20 120 (lim.), 1. 608'11", b. 75'6", dr. 26'6" (lim.) s. 19.0 k., cp;. 495; tr. 4,985, a. (none installed at time of commissioning); cl. Admiral W. Benson; T. P2-SE2-R1)

Admiral W. Sims (AP-127) was 1aid down on 15 June 1944 at Alameda, Calif., by the Bethlehem-Alameda Shipbuilding Corp., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 685); launched on 4 June 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Anne Hitchcock Sims, widow of the late Admiral Sims delivered to the Navy on 27 September 1945 and commissioned the same day, Capt. Edward C. Holden, USNR, in command.

Following shakedown training out of San Pedro and postshakedown availability at the Todd shipyards at Wilmington, Calif., the transport sailed for the Philippines on 20 October with 222 passengers. She arrived at Manila on 6 November, and departed the Philippine port with 4,980 troops and passengers arriving at San Francisco on 25 November. She commenced her second round-trip voyage to the Philippines with her departure from San Francisco on 7 December. Arriving at Manila on the 22d, the transport sailed for home two days after Christmas. Rerouted during the return voyage, Admiral W. Sims reached San Pedro with 4,973 passengers on board on 11 January 1946. She subsequently conducted one troop lift from Okinawa, sailing from San Pedro on 3 February 1946, and bringing home 4,988 Army troops to Seattle on 6 March.

Admiral W. Sims made one more voyage to the Far East as a Navy transport. After shifting down the west coast from Seattle to San Francisco, she sailed from the latter port on 27 March for Korean waters, with 2,966 Army troops embarked. The transport arrived at Jinsen (now Inchon), on 11 April 1946, and, after embarking 106 passengers at Jinsen sailed for Okinawa, arriving there on 15 April and embarking 910 additional passengers. Clearing Buckner Bay for the Philippines on 16 April, the ship disembarked 26 people at Manila, and embarked 4,106 others for passage to the west coast of the United States. Sims reached San Francisco on 7 May.

Decommissioned at San Francisco on 21 June 1946, she was simultaneously transferred to the War Shipping Adminustration. Sims was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 3 July 1946.

Turned over to the Army for operation with the Army Trans Service (ATS), the ship was renamed General William 0.

arby in honor of Brigadier General William O. Darby, USA

(1911-1945), leader of the famed World War II "Deby's Rangers" who distinguished themselves in combat in North Africa, in Sicily and in Italy. He was killed in action on the Italian front on 30 April 1945, while serving as Assistant Commander of the 10th hountain Division.

After operations with the ATS as USAT General William 0. Darby, the ship was reacquired by the Navy on 1 March 1950 and reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register on 28 April 1950 as USNS General William 0. Darby (T-AP-127). Operating out of New York under the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), the transport steamed between Europe and the Mediterranean carrying troops on rotation, military dependents, and supplies. Between 1950 and 1953, she made more than 20 round trip voyages to Bremerhaven, Germany, and back. In November, 1951, the ship veered 100 miles off course to respond to an SOS from a German freighter in the Bay of Biscay. Thirteen of General William 0. Darhy s sailors volunteered to man a lifeboat and brave the 30-foot seas to transfer a critically burned German sailor to the transport for medical treatment.

Departing New York on 20 June 1953, General William 0. Darby proceeded to Yokosuka, Japan, via the Panama Canal, arrinng at the Japanese port on 17 July to embark Korean War veterans. Returnmg to Seattle on 29 July, the transport made five more round-trip voyages between the west coast of the United States and Japan during the next five months. After returning to San Francisco on 23 January 1954, she sailed for the east coast on the 25th to resume operations with MSTS (Atlantic), and reached New York on 8 February. During 1954 and 1955, the ship conducted 12 and 13 round-trips, respectively, and, in the first SiX months of 1956, conducted seven before being deployed to the Mediterranean to support the operations of the 6th Fleet.

Ranging from North Africa to Turkey during that tour, she eventually returned to New York on 6 August 1956. Between 1956 and 1965, the ship conducted some 135 runs to Bremerhaven and back, deploying to the Mediterranean on nine occasions. Dunng the period, the ship took part in the mass movement of 50,000 troops to Cherbourg and Bremerhaven during the Berlin crisis in the autumn of 1961, the biggest troop-lift for MSTS since the Korean cease-fire in 1953. In February 1963, General William 0. Darby brought back from Bremerhaven two paintings loaned temporarily to the United States from the French Louvre Whistler's Mother and La Madeleine. Scheduled to be shown at a succession of art galleries from New York to Atlanta, the two art treasures were met upon arrival at Pier 4, Brooklyn Army Terminal, by cultural attaches from the French embassy.

With the buildup of American strength in Vietnam in 1965, all six MSTS (Atlantic) transports, including General William 0. Darby, were withdrawn from the New York-to-Bremerhaven run and assigned to duty in the Pacific. Transatlantic sailings were cancelled in late July 1965. General William 0. Darby and hersistership, General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122), carried out the longest point-to-point trooplift in MSTS history when they arrived at Vung Tau, Vietnam, on 13 August 1965 with 3,124 troops embarked between them, having sailed from Boston a voyage of 12,358 miles. They had departed the east coast on 15 July, transited the Panama Canal on the 20th, and fueled at Long Beach on the 27th. The longest leg of the voyage was non-stop, Long Beach to Vung Tau, a distance of some 7,291 miles.

Placed in reserve at Caven Point Army Depot in New York harbor in 1968, General William 0. Darby was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 9 January 1969 and transferred to the Maritime Commission's reserve fleet. At one point in 1976 the state of Maryland expressed an interest in alleviating its overcrowded correctional facilities by the use of the ship. Vehement objections to the retention of the name of the Army war hero on a ship designated to incarcerate prisoners apparently arose, contributing in large part to the cancellation of the ship's name on 6 July 1976. The ship herself, now merely the unnamed T-AP-127, remained on the Naval Vessel Register. ReclassiSed as IX-510 in October, 1981, the ship was towed from her berth in the James River to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, where she was placed in service on 1 July 1982. In 1987 she was serving as a barracks and accommodation ship at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, providing berthing and messing facilities for ships undergomg work at the yard.

General William 0. Darhy (T-AP-127) was awarded one battle star for her service during the Vietnam War.


Admiral W. S Sims - History

USS Admiral W. S. Sims , a 9,676-ton (light displacement) Admiral W. S. Benson -class transport, was built at Alameda, California. Constructed for the U.S. Maritime Commission to its P2-SE2-R1 design, she was transferred to the Navy and commissioned in late September 1945. She never received her designed armament and fire control equipment, installation of which was cancelled several weeks before commissioning due to the end of World War II. After shakedown training she made four voyages as a Navy transport: two round-trips to Manila, one to Okinawa, and one that touched at Inchon in Korea, Okinawa and Manila. Admiral W. S. Sims was decommissioned at San Francisco in June 1946 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration for simultaneous transfer to the Army. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in July 1946.

The ship completed initial conversion for Army use at San Pedro, California, in August 1946. The Army began operating her with a civilian crew as USAT Admiral W. S. Sims , but soon renamed her in honor of Army Brigadier General William O. Darby, who had been killed in action at the end of April 1945. Between January and October 1948 the ship underwent full conversion to a peacetime transport. USAT General William O. Darby continued to operate for the Army until, in March 1950, all Army transports were transferred to the newly created Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS). As a civilian-manned MSTS transport she was owned by the Navy but retained her Army name. USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127) spent most of her career on the route between New York and Bremerhaven, West Germany, supporting U. S. military forces in Europe. Between June 1953 and January 1954, however, she operated in the Pacific helping to bring home Korean War veterans, and during 1956 she deployed to the Mediterranean in support of the Sixth Fleet. In mid-1965 all six MSTS transports in the Atlantic were transferred to the Pacific for use during the Vietnam buildup. In 1967 General William O. Darby was laid up in ready reserve at the Cavin Point (New Jersey) Army Depot in New York harbor. In June 1970 she was moved to the Maritime Administration's reserve fleet, in Virginia's James River, and in July 1971 was permanently transferred to the Maritime Administration, although the Navy retained ownership and the ship remained on the Naval Vessel Register.

In June 1976 an unimplemented proposal to loan the ship to the State of Maryland as a prison ship caused her to lose her name, becoming simply AP-127 . In October 1981 the Navy withdrew her from the James River fleet and moved her to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, where in July 1982 she was placed in service as a barracks ship and reclassified IX-510 (still without name). Her primary use was to support the crews of aircraft carriers undergoing overhaul and construction at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. IX-510 was returned to the James River reserve fleet in April 1991, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in October 1993, and transferred to full Maritime Administration ownership in May 1999. In February 2005 she was towed to Brownsville, Texas, to be dismantled.

This page features, or provides links to, most of the views we have related to USS Admiral W. S. Sims (AP-127), USAT Admiral W. S. Sims , USAT General William O. Darby , USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127), USS AP-127 , and USS IX-510 .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Admiral W.S. Sims (AP-127)

Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken circa 1945, probably in the San Francisco Bay area, California.
Transferred to the U.S. Army in 1946 and renamed General William O. Darby , this ship became USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127) in 1950.

Copied from the book "Troopships of World War II", by Roland W. Charles.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 46KB 740 x 405 pixels

In San Francisco Bay on 9 January 1947 while serving as an Army transport.
The Army soon renamed this ship General William O. Darby .

Official U.S. Army Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph,
from the Military Sealift Command collection.

Online Image: 37KB 740 x 390 pixels

USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

Photographed circa the 1950s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph,
from the Military Sealift Command collection.

Online Image: 64KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

Testing her Atomic, Biological and Chemical (ABC) water washdown system circa the 1950s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph,
from the Military Sealift Command collection.

Online Image: 67KB 740 x 610 pixels

USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

Pierside at Bremerhaven, Germany, in 1963. Underway on the left is USNS Geiger (T-AP-197), and in the distance in the center is one of Darby 's sisters, most likely either General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) or General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph,
from the Military Sealift Command collection.

Online Image: 55KB 740 x 575 pixels

MSTS transports in Ready Reserve

Four MSTS Atlantic Fleet transports in Ready Reserve at the Cavin Point Army Depot, New York, circa early 1967. The ship in the right foreground is USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123), with USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127) on the far side of the pier. Ahead of them respectively are USNS General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) and USNS General Maurice Rose (T-AP-126).


USS Admiral W. S. Sims (AP-127)

Admiral W. S. Sims (AP-127) was laid down on 15 June 1944 at Alameda, California, by the Bethlehem-Alameda Shipbuilding Corp., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC null 685) launched on 4 June 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Anne Hitchcock Sims, widow of the late Admiral Sims delivered to the U.S. Navy on 27 September 1945 and commissioned the same day, Captain Edward C. Holden, USNR, in command.

Following shakedown training out of San Pedro and post-shakedown availability at the Todd shipyards at Wilmington, California, the transport sailed for the Philippines on 20 October with 222 passengers. She arrived at Manila on 6 November, and departed the Philippine port with 4,980 troops and passengers, arriving at San Francisco on 25 November. She commenced her second round-trip voyage to the Philippines with her departure from San Francisco on 7 December. Arriving at Manila on the 22d, the transport sailed for home two days after Christmas. Rerouted during the return voyage, Admiral W. S. Sims reached San Pedro with 4,973 passengers on board on 11 January 1946. She subsequently conducted one troop lift from Okinawa, sailing from San Pedro on 3 February 1946, and bringing home 4,988 Army troops to Seattle on 6 March.

Admiral W. S. Sims made one more voyage to the Far East as a Navy transport. After shifting down the west coast from Seattle to San Francisco, she sailed from the latter port on 27 March for Korean waters, with 2,966 Army troops embarked. The transport arrived at Jinsen (now Inchon), on 11 April 1946, and, after embarking 106 passengers at Jinsen sailed for Okinawa, arriving there on 15 April and embarking 910 additional passengers. Clearing Buckner Bay for the Philippines on 16 April, the ship disembarked 26 people at Manila, and embarked 4,106 others for passage to the west coast of the United States. Admiral W. S. Sims reached San Francisco on 7 May.

Decommissioned at San Francisco on 21 June 1946, she was simultaneously transferred to the War Shipping Administration. Admiral W. S. Sims was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 3 July 1946.

Turned over to the Army for operation with the Army Transport Service (ATS), the ship was renamed General William O. Darby in honor of Brigadier General William O. Darby, USA (1911-1945), leader of the famed World War II "Darby's Rangers" who distinguished themselves in combat in North Africa, in Sicily, and in Italy. He was killed in action on the Italian front on 30 April 1945, while serving as Assistant Commander of the 10th Mountain Division.

After operations with the ATS as USAT General William O. Darby, the ship was reacquired by the Navy on 1 March 1950 and reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register on 28 April 1950 as USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127). Operating out of New York under the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), the transport steamed between Europe and the Mediterranean carrying troops on rotation, military dependents, and supplies. Between 1950 and 1953, she made more than 20 round trip voyages to Bremerhaven, Germany, and back. In November, 1951, the ship veered 100 miles off course to respond to an SOS from a German freighter in the Bay of Biscay. Thirteen of General William O. Darby's sailors volunteered to man a lifeboat and brave the 30-foot seas to transfer a critically burned German sailor to the transport for medical treatment.

Departing New York on 20 June 1953, General William O. Darby proceeded to Yokosuka, Japan, via the Panama Canal, arriving at the Japanese port on 17 July to embark Korean War veterans. Returning to Seattle on 29 July, the transport made five more round-trip voyages between the west coast of the United States and Japan during the next five months. After returning to San Francisco on 23 January 1954, she sailed for the east coast on the 25th to resume operations with MSTS (Atlantic), and reached New York on 8 February. During 1954 and 1955, the ship conducted 12 and 13 round-trips, respectively, and, in the first six months of 1956, conducted seven before being deployed to the Mediterranean to support the operations of the 6th Fleet.

Ranging from North Africa to Turkey during that tour, she eventually returned to New York on 6 August 1956. Between 1956 and 1965, the ship conducted some 135 runs to Bremerhaven and back, deploying to the Mediterranean on nine occasions. During the period, the ship took part in the mass movement of 50,000 troops to Cherbourg and Bremerhaven during the Berlin crisis in the autumn of 1961, the biggest troop-lift for MSTS since the Korean cease-fire in 1953. In February 1963, General William O. Darby brought back from Bremerhaven two paintings loaned temporarily to the United States from the French Louvre, Whistler's Mother and La Madeleine. Scheduled to be shown at a succession of art galleries from New York to Atlanta, the two art treasures were met upon arrival at Pier 4, Brooklyn Army Terminal, by cultural attaches from the French embassy.

With the buildup of American strength in Vietnam in 1965, all six MSTS (Atlantic) transports, including General William O. Darby, were withdrawn from the New York-to-Bremerhaven run and assigned to duty in the Pacific. Transatlantic sailings were cancelled in late July 1965. General William O. Darby and her sister ship, General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122), carried out the longest point-to-point trooplift in MSTS history when they arrived at Vung Tau, Vietnam, on 13 August 1965 with 3,124 troops embarked between them, having sailed from Boston, a voyage of 12,358 miles. They had departed the east coast on 15 July, transited the Panama Canal on the 20th, and fueled at Long Beach on the 27th. The longest leg of the voyage was non-stop, Long Beach to Vung Tau, a distance of some 7,291 miles.

Placed in reserve at Caven Point Army Depot in New York harbor in 1968, General William O. Darby was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 9 January 1969 and transferred to the Maritime Commission's reserve fleet. At one point in 1976, the state of Maryland expressed an interest in alleviating its overcrowded correctional facilities by the use of the ship. Vehement objections to the retention of the name of the Army war hero on a ship designated to incarcerate prisoners apparently arose, contributing in large part to the cancellation of the ship's name on 6 July 1976. The ship, herself, now merely the unnamed T-AP-127, remained on the Naval Vessel Register. Reclassified as IX-510 in October, 1981, the ship was towed from her berth in the James River to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, where she was placed in service on 1 July 1982. In 1987 she was serving as a barracks and accommodation ship at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, providing berthing and messing facilities for ships undergoing work at the yard. [1]


SIMS DD 409

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Sims Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 15 July 1937 - Launched 8 April 1939

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

First Day Postal Service, cachet by Al Cohen

First day cover for the Horace Mann stamp (Sc. 869). Add-on cachet by Michael Brock

From the backside of the Add-on cachet by Michael Brock

First day cover for the Horace Mann stamp (Sc. 869). Add-on cachet by Michael Brock

Other Information

USS SIMS earned 2 battle stars for her World War II service

NAMESAKE - Admiral William Sowden Sims, USN (October 15 1858 – September 25 1936).
Sims, born in 1858 in Ontario, Canada, was appointed to the Naval Academy in 1876 and graduated in 1880. Seventeen years of sea duty were followed by assignments as Naval Attaché to Paris, St. Petersburg, and Madrid. Sims next served as Inspector of Target Practice and, under his supervision, the naval gunnery system increased the rapidity of hits 100 percent and the general effectiveness of fire 500 percent. He also served as Naval Aide to President Theodore Roosevelt for two and one-half years. On 11 February 1917, Sims became President of the Naval War College. In March 1917, he was designated by the Secretary of the Navy as Representative of the Navy Department in London. With the entry of the United States into World War I in April, he was ordered to assume command of all American destroyers, tenders, and auxiliaries operating from British bases. In May, he was designated as Commander of United States Destroyers Operating from British Bases, with the rank of Vice Admiral and, in June, his title was changed to Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. On 10 December 1917, he assumed additional duty as Naval Attaché, London, England. The North Sea Mine Barrage was laid under his direction. Admiral Sims again became President of the Naval War College in April 1919 and served in that capacity until his retirement on 15 October 1922.

Four ships in the US Navy have been named in his honor USS Sims DD-409, USS Sims APD-50, USS W. S. Sims FF-1059 and USS Admiral W. S. Sims AP-127.

The ships sponsor was Mrs. William S. Sims.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


USS Admiral W.S. Sims AP-127

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Admiral W. S Sims - History

Born 15 October 1858 at Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, he was appointed to the Naval Academy from Pennsylvania in 1876 and was graduated in 1880. Seventeen years of sea duty were followed by assignments as Naval Attaché to Paris, St. Petersburg, and Madrid. Sims next served as Inspector of Target Practice and, under his supervision, the naval gunnery system increased the rapidity of hits 100 percent and the general effectiveness of fire 500 percent. He also served as Naval Aide to President Theodore Roosevelt for two and one-half years.

On 11 February 1917, Sims became President of the Naval War College. In March 1917, he was designated by the Secretary of the Navy as Representative of the Navy Department in London. With the entry of the United States into World War I in April, he assumed command of all American destroyers, tenders, and auxiliaries operating from British bases. In May, he was designated as Commander of United States Destroyers Operating from British Bases, with the rank of vice admiral and, in June, his title was changed to Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. On 10 December 1917, he assumed additional duty as Naval Attaché, London, England. Commander of U.S. Naval Forces in European waters during World War I, he adopted the use of naval convoys and promoted the construction of destroyers to counter Germany&rsquos use of unrestricted submarine warfare. The North Sea Mine Barrage was laid under his direction.

Admiral Sims again became President of the Naval War College in April 1919 and served in that capacity until his retirement on 15 October 1922. His book on Anglo-American naval cooperation in the war at sea during World War I, Victory at Sea, won the Pulitzer Prize in history in 1920. He died at Boston on 25 September 1936.


Sims History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Sims was first found in East Lothian, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

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Early History of the Sims family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sims research. Another 119 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1162, 1503, 1530, and 1596 are included under the topic Early Sims History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Sims Spelling Variations

Spelling rules had not yet evolved in medieval Scotland, some names dating from that era often appear many different ways. Some spelling variations of Sims include Simms, Symes, Sime, Simes, Sim, Sym, Syms, Syme and others.

Early Notables of the Sims family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Sims Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Sims family to Ireland

Some of the Sims family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 77 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Sims migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sims Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Andrew Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [1]
  • Bartholomew Sims, who arrived in Virginia in 1663-1664 [1]
  • Job Sims who settled in Nevis in 1663
  • Samuel Sims, who arrived in Maryland or Virginia in 1672 [1]
  • Eleanor Sims, who landed in Maryland in 1679 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Sims Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1714 [1]
  • Thomas Sims, who arrived in Virginia in 1716 [1]
  • John Sims, who settled in Maryland in 1737
  • William Sims, who settled in Virginia in 1749
  • Joanna Sims, who landed in Virginia in 1750 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Sims Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Charles H Sims, who arrived in Texas in 1835 [1]
  • Henry Sims, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1838 [1]
  • Robert Sims, who arrived in New York in 1838 [1]
  • John Sims, who landed in Mississippi in 1840 [1]
  • Frederick Sims, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1840 [1]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Sims Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • John Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • John Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Robert Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Fardinando Sims, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Fred Sims, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Sims Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Daniel Sims, English convict who was convicted in Surrey, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Atlas" on 16th January 1816, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Ebenezer Sims, a bricklayer, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Mr. William Sims, English convict who was convicted in Dorset, England for life, transported aboard the "Burrell" on 22nd July 1830, arriving in New South Wales[3]
  • Mr. George Maurice Sims, (b. 1815), aged 18, English convict who was convicted in Wiltshire, England for 14 years for theft, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 3rd November 1833, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1911 [4]
  • Mr. John Sims, British Convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asia" on 20th July 1837, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Sims migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Sims Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • James Sims, aged 39, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • Margaret Sims, aged 36, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • James Sims, aged 17, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • Margaret Sims, aged 14, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • John Sims, aged 11, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Duchess of Argyle" in 1842
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Sims (post 1700) +

  • Christopher Albert "Chris" Sims (b. 1942), American econometrician and macroeconomist, recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2011)
  • Chloe Linda Daisy Margaret Sims (b. 1981), English television personality known for appearing in the ITVBe reality series The Only Way Is Essex
  • Jena Michelle Sims (b. 1988), American actress, known for B movies like Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader (2012), 3-Headed Shark Attack (2015) and Sharknado 5: Global Swarming (2017), Miss Georgia Teen USA in 2007
  • Jocko Sims (b. 1981), American actor, best known for playing Anthony Adams in Crash and later playing Carlton Burk in the series The Last Ship
  • Bill Sims Jr. (1949-2019), American blues musician
  • John Sims (1749-1831), English botanist and physician, son of R. C. Sims, M.D., a member of the Society of Friends, who for sixty years practised at Dunmow, Essex
  • James Sims (1741-1820), Irish physician, son of a dissenting minister, born in co. Down
  • David Nigel Sims (1931-2018), English footballer who played as a goalkeeper from the 1940s through 1967
  • Scott Sims DVM (1955-2015), American veterinarian and television personality
  • William Sowden Sims (1858-1936), American admiral in the United States Navy, recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1921), eponym of the USS Sims (DD-409), USS Sims (DE-153), USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059) and the USS Admiral W. S. Sims (AP-127)
  • . (Another 13 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Sims family +

HMS Hood
  • Mr. William Sims (b. 1920), English Engine Room Artificer 4th Class serving for the Royal Navy from Chobham, Surrey, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [6]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Frank G. Sims, British Leading Supply Assistant with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [7]

Related Stories +

The Sims Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna et labore
Motto Translation: By fortune and labor.


The Strange Disappearance of Admiral Wilcox

Man overboard” is perhaps the most chilling phrase one can hear on board a ship. And when those words were heard on the morning of 27 March 1942, one of the most baffling incidents in U.S. naval history began. To this day it has never been satisfactorily resolved.

That morning, a U.S. Navy task force was zigzagging through the wintry North Atlantic, bound for a rendezvous with Royal Navy ships near Scapa Flow, off the north coast of Scotland. The 13-ship task force included the battleship Washington (BB-56), the aircraft carrier Wasp (CV-7), two heavy cruisers, and eight destroyers. In command was Rear Admiral John W. Wilcox Jr., on board the Washington. Almost four months after the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, this tiny armada was the strongest force the U.S. Navy could muster in the Atlantic.

On the Washington’s bridge, Lieutenant (junior grade) William Fargo, officer of the deck, tried to see through the snow and freezing spray, alert for any indication of an enemy assault—from the sea, under the sea, or the air. Forward of the bridge, the barrels of the 16-inch guns were glazed with ice. Waves slammed over the ship’s bow, drenching the deck with icy water.

On the fantail, a lookout shivered in his foul-weather gear. His eyes swept the gray waves and the battlewagon’s wake for anything out of the ordinary. According to the ship’s log, at 1031 came the heart-stopping cry: “Man overboard!” The fantail lookout could see a man in the water. The Washington and all other ships in the task force were under radio silence, so Captain H. H. J. Benson ordered the message to be relayed to the other ships by whistle and flags.

Two of the task-force destroyers closed toward the flagship’s wake. The cruiser Tuscaloosa (CA-37), in the murky light some distance behind, signaled that a man could be seen in the water, apparently swimming toward a life ring. But moments later, the destroyer Livermore (DD-429) reported sighting the man floating face down in the raging, heaving sea. Neither ship could recover him. The question on board the Washington, and all the other task-force ships, from skipper to seaman, was the same: Who was the man overboard?

A roll call of every officer and seaman was made, in all 2,000 men, and every man of the Washington’s crew was accounted for. Captain Benson ordered a recount, and this time he ordered officers to sight each man in his charge as his name was called. After all, there was no doubt that someone had fallen overboard—no fewer than six officers and men on three ships had seen the man struggling in the water.

The task force plowed through sea and weather, and the missing man was long-since lost now. But who was he? The second head count was the same as the first. All officers and men were accounted for. Benson still believed there was an error, but he nonetheless ordered that the report be submitted to Admiral Wilcox.

An officer took it to the admiral’s cabin. The Marine sentry on duty outside opened the door—and the cabin was empty. Where was the admiral? The ship was searched. He was not on board. The answer to the puzzle suddenly was clear. Only one man was not listed in the ship’s muster rolls—Admiral Wilcox—who had to be the missing man.

In a later board of inquiry, it was revealed that shortly before the admiral was spotted in the water, several men had seen him on deck. They reported that he looked pale, and a couple of men thought he acted confused while trying to get from one part of the ship to another.

The board of inquiry determined that “The loss at sea of Rear Admiral Wilcox was not caused in any manner by the intent, fault, negligence, or inefficiency of any person or persons in the naval service or connected therewith. . . . John W. Wilcox, Junior, late Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy, died on March 27, 1942, in the line of duty and not as the result of his own misconduct.”


Contents

Admiral's Wreckage [ edit | edit source ]

Admiral's Wreckage
Few remember how or when an old trawler became so dramatically landlocked. Even fewer know what remains of this vessel in ruins.
Lot type Residential
Value §51,811
Lot size 50x50
Lot traits Off-the-Grid
Bedrooms 1
Bathrooms 1
World Sulani
Game The Sims 4: Island Living

Admiral's Wreckage is an uninhabited lot in Mua Pel'am. It is unknown how or when this old trawler became landlocked. Not much remains of the trawler. It is close to the waterfall and the cave.

Caldera Camp [ edit | edit source ]

Caldera Camp
This ramshackle shelter, precariously sits at the base of an active volcano, is the first and potentially last stop for the most intrepid conservationists.
Lot type Residential
Value §20,098
Lot size 30x20
Lot traits Volcanic Activity
Number of floors 1
Bedrooms 1
Bathrooms 1
World Sulani
Game The Sims 4: Island Living

Caldera Camp is an uninhabited lot in Mua Pel'am. It has one floor and sits at the base of the Volcano.

Key Point [ edit | edit source ]

Key Point
This classic deserted islet formed from the natural accumulation of sand shored up by the surronding reefs happens to make for the prefect untouched beach.
Lot type Residential
Value §7,000
Lot size 40x30
Lot traits Oceanic Paradise
Off-the-Grid
World Sulani
Game The Sims 4: Island Living

Key Point is an empty lot in Mua Pel'am. It is situated on a small isle, perfect for building a small home.


Rear-Admiral R.L. Patterson, OMM, MSM, CD, CHE - Biography

Rear-Admiral Rebecca Patterson enrolled in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) as a critical care Nursing Officer in 1989 after obtaining a Niagara College Diploma in Nursing. A BScN/PCNP certificate ( Summa Cum Laude ) from the University of Ottawa was soon accomplished, which was followed by an occupational transfer to Health Services Operations Officer. Rear-Admiral Patterson went on to qualify as a Certified Health Executive with the Canadian College of Health Leaders and then graduated from the CF Command and Staff College Advanced Military Studies Course.

Rear-Admiral Patterson has worked in a number of health care domains, which include providing direct patient care, delivering and leading CAF medical education and training, overseeing and directing national level medical planning in support of CAF missions at home and abroad and leading a large CAF primary care health centre. In 2012, Rear-Admiral Patterson was appointed Commander of 1 Health Services Group, followed by an appointment to the position of Deputy Commander, Canadian Forces Health Services Group in 2016. A subsequent appointment to the Director General Professional Military Conduct – Operation HONOUR (DG PMC-OpH) ensued in 2018. Rear-Admiral Patterson was appointed to the current position of Commander Canadian Forces Health Services in July 2020.

Rear-Admiral Patterson deployed as a member of Op SCALPEL with 1 Canadian Field Hospital during the Persian Gulf Conflict in 1991 (Saudi Arabia), Op DELIVERANCE in support of the Canadian Airborne Regiment in 1993 (Somalia), and Op ATTENTION with the NATO Training Mission – Afghanistan (Kabul) 2011-2012, where responsibility was granted for leading a multinational team tasked to assist the Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police with re-establishing their medical education and training system. In February 2014, Rear-Admiral Patterson was recognized for contributions to the mission in Afghanistan and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal from the Governor General of Canada and was inducted as an Officer in the Order of Military Merit in 2018.

Rear-Admiral Patterson remains an active member of the College of Nurses of Ontario, the Canadian College of Health Leaders and serves on the Board of Directors for Soldiers Helping Soldiers. Rear-Admiral Patterson was named one of 12 Global Edmonton Women of Vision, was granted the Ontario Premiers Award for Excellence in Health Sciences for Ontario College graduates, received recognition for “Breaking Down the Barrricades” in Esprit de Corps magazine’s highlights on women’s contributions to the Defence community, and was presented with the Niagara College Distinguished Alumni Award. Named the CAF Defence Champion for Women in 2018, Rear-Admiral Patterson continues to serve in this capacity.



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