Interesting

Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line

Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

On July 30, 2003, the last of 21,529,464 Volkswagen Beetles built since World War II rolls off the production line at Volkswagen’s plant in Puebla, Mexico. One of a 3,000-unit final edition, the baby-blue vehicle was sent to a museum in Wolfsburg, Germany, where Volkswagen is headquartered.

The car produced in Puebla that day was the last so-called “classic” VW Beetle, which is not to be confused with the redesigned new Beetle that Volkswagen introduced in 1998. (The new Beetle resembles the classic version but is based on the VW Golf.) The roots of the classic Beetle stretch back to the mid-1930s, when the famed Austrian automotive engineer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche met German leader Adolf Hitler’s request for a small, affordable passenger car to satisfy the transportation needs of the German people Hitler called the result the KdF (Kraft-durch-Freude)-Wagen(or “Strength-Through-Joy” car) after a Nazi-led movement ostensibly aimed at helping the working people of Germany; it would later be known by the name Porsche preferred: Volkswagen, or “people’s car.”

The first production-ready Kdf-Wagen debuted at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939; the international press soon dubbed it the “Beetle” for its distinctive rounded shape. During World War II, the factory in Kdf-stat (later renamed Wolfsburg) continued to make Beetles, though it was largely dedicated to production of war vehicles. Production was halted under threat of Allied bombing in August 1944 and did not resume until after the war, under British control. Though VW sales were initially slower in the United States compared with the rest of the world, by 1960 the Beetle was the top-selling import in America, thanks to an iconic ad campaign by the firm Doyle Dane Bernbach. In 1972, the Beetle surpassed the longstanding worldwide production record of 15 million vehicles, set by Ford Motor Company’s legendary Model T between 1908 and 1927. It also became a worldwide cultural icon, featuring prominently in the hit 1969 movie “The Love Bug” (which starred a Beetle named Herbie) and on the cover of the Beatles album “Abbey Road.”

In 1977, however, the Beetle, with its rear-mounted, air-cooled-engine, was banned in America for failing to meet safety and emission standards. Worldwide sales of the car shrank by the late 1970s and by 1988, the classic Beetle was sold only in Mexico. Due to increased competition from other manufacturers of inexpensive compact cars, and a Mexican decision to phase out two-door taxis, Volkswagen decided to discontinue production of the classic bug in 2003. The final count of 21,529,464, incidentally, did not include the original 600 cars built by the Nazis prior to World War II.


Volkswagen Beetle reaches the end of the road this week after 81 years

More Photos

FRANKFURT, Germany — Volkswagen is halting production of the last version of its Beetle model this week at its plant in Puebla, Mexico. It’s the end of the road for a vehicle that has symbolized many things over a history spanning the eight decades since 1938.

It has been: A part of Germany’s darkest hours as a never-realized Nazi prestige project. A symbol of Germany’s postwar economic renaissance and rising middle-class prosperity. An example of globalization, sold and recognized all over the world. An emblem of the 1960s counterculture in the United States. And above all, a landmark in design, as recognizable as the Coca-Cola bottle.

The car’s original design — a rounded silhouette with seating for four or five, nearly vertical windshield and the air-cooled engine in the rear — can be traced back to Austrian engineer Ferdinand Porsche, who was hired to fulfill German dictator Adolf Hitler’s project for a “people’s car” that would spread auto ownership the way the Ford Model T had in the U.S.

Aspects of the car bore similarities to the Tatra T97, made in Czechoslovakia in 1937, and to sketches by Hungarian engineer Bela Barenyi published in 1934. Mass production of what was called the KdF-Wagen, based on the acronym of the Nazi labor organization under whose auspices it was to be sold, was cancelled due to World War II. Instead, the massive new plant in what was then countryside east of Hanover turned out military vehicles, using forced laborers from all over Europe under miserable conditions.

Re-launched as a civilian carmaker under supervision of the British occupation authorities, the Volkswagen factory was transferred in 1949 to the Germany government and the state of Lower Saxony, which still owns part of the company. By 1955, the one millionth Beetle — officially called the Type 1 — had rolled off the assembly line in what was now the town of Wolfsburg.

The United States became Volkswagen’s most important foreign market, peaking at 563,522 cars in 1968, or 40% of production. Unconventional, sometimes humorous advertising from agency Doyle Dane Bernbach urged car buyers to “Think small.”

“Unlike in West Germany, where its low price, quality and durability stood for a new postwar normality, in the United States the Beetle’s characteristics lent it a profoundly unconventional air in a car culture dominated by size and showmanship,” wrote Bernhard Rieger in his 2013 history, “The People’s Car.”

Production at Wolfsburg ended in 1978 as newer front drive models like the Golf took over. But the Beetle wasn’t dead yet. Production went on in Mexico from 1967 until 2003 — longer than the car had been made in Germany. Nicknamed the “vochito,” the car made itself at home as a rugged, Mexican-made “carro del pueblo.”

The end of the Beetle comes at a turning point for Volkswagen as it rebounds from a scandal over cars rigged to cheat on diesel emissions tests. The company is gearing up for mass production of the battery-driven electric compact ID.3, a car that the company predicts will have an impact like that of the Beetle and the Golf by brining electric mobility to a mass market.

The New Beetle — a completely new retro version build on a modified Golf platform — resurrected some of the old Beetle’s cute, unconventional aura in 1998 under CEO Ferdinand Piech, Ferdinand Porsche’s grandson. In 2012, the Beetle’s design was made a bit sleeker. The last of 5,961 Final Edition versions is headed for a museum after ceremonies in Puebla on Wednesday, July 10, mark the end of production.


The Last VW Beetle Rolls Off The Assembly Line In Mexico This Week

It's the end of an era — an era that has stretched on for a very long time, albeit with slightly different silhouettes.

The last Volkswagen Beetle, a third-generation Denim Blue coupe, will be produced in Puebla, Mexico, on Wednesday.

"It's impossible to imagine where Volkswagen would be without the Beetle," said Scott Keogh, president and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America. "While its time has come, the role it has played in the evolution of our brand will be forever cherished."

An emblem of the hippie era in America, the car was marketed in the U.S. as adorably uncool. Volkswagen promoted the Beetle with cheeky advertising campaigns using slogans like "Live below your means" and "It's ugly, but it gets you there." In 1969, one of the vehicles cost $1,799.

Perhaps that image — and its good value — helped the auto to overcome a not-proud history: Volkswagen was founded as a project of Adolf Hitler, and its earliest cars were used for both civilian and military purposes. Volkswagen was relaunched by British authorities after World War II, and its car was rebranded as the Beetle to distance it from its Nazi heritage.

It worked. A couple decades later, the car was the anthropomorphized star of a run of movies starting with The Love Bug and on to Herbie Fully Loaded.

Volkswagen launched the New Beetle in the 1998 model year, aiming for whimsy with a built-in flower vase. It found initial success, with 80,000 sold in the U.S. in 1999.

The automaker revamped the Beetle again for 2012, but sales sputtered as time went on and SUVs became popular in the U.S. As Volkswagen writes in a love letter to its most famous creation: "Cult is not necessarily synonymous with sales. . The Beetle has not been able to attain the global success of the new 'Volkswagen,' the Golf."

The current Beetle starts at $20,895 and comes in a sporty convertible model, too. Both are ending production on Friday.

The Beetle hasn't been produced in Germany since the 1970s. But production of the original Beetle continued at the Puebla facility until 2003, and the later editions were exclusively produced in Puebla.

The factory in Puebla has been producing cars for more than 60 years and is a worldwide export hub for VW's vehicles. Once it stops producing the Beetle, it will turn to producing a new compact SUV that will be positioned below the company's Tiguan model.

While production of the Beetle is ending, don't think the nostalgia is over. Volkswagen has plans to launch a new version of its classic VW bus in 2022 — this time, it's electric.

And in this era when most anything can be rebooted, VW didn't close the door forever on the Beetle.

"[T]here are no immediate plans to replace it," Volkswagen Group of America's then-President and CEO Hinrich Woebcken said last year. "I would also say, 'Never say never.' "


The Last VW Beetle Rolls Off The Assembly Line In Mexico This Week

It's the end of an era — an era that has stretched on for a very long time, albeit with slightly different silhouettes.

The last Volkswagen Beetle, a third-generation Denim Blue coupe, will be produced in Puebla, Mexico, on Wednesday.

"It's impossible to imagine where Volkswagen would be without the Beetle," said Scott Keogh, president and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America. "While its time has come, the role it has played in the evolution of our brand will be forever cherished."

An emblem of the hippie era in America, the car was marketed in the U.S. as adorably uncool. Volkswagen promoted the Beetle with cheeky advertising campaigns using slogans like "Live below your means" and "It's ugly, but it gets you there." In 1969, one of the vehicles cost $1,799.

Perhaps that image — and its good value — helped the auto to overcome a not-proud history: Volkswagen was founded as a project of Adolf Hitler, and its earliest cars were used for both civilian and military purposes. Volkswagen was relaunched by British authorities after World War II, and its car was rebranded as the Beetle to distance it from its Nazi heritage.

It worked. A couple decades later, the car was the anthropomorphized star of a run of movies starting with The Love Bug and on to Herbie Fully Loaded.

Volkswagen launched the New Beetle in the 1998 model year, aiming for whimsy with a built-in flower vase. It found initial success, with 80,000 sold in the U.S. in 1999.

The automaker revamped the Beetle again for 2012, but sales sputtered as time went on and SUVs became popular in the U.S. As Volkswagen writes in a love letter to its most famous creation: "Cult is not necessarily synonymous with sales. . The Beetle has not been able to attain the global success of the new 'Volkswagen,' the Golf."

The current Beetle starts at $20,895 and comes in a sporty convertible model, too. Both are ending production on Friday.

The Beetle hasn't been produced in Germany since the 1970s. But production of the original Beetle continued at the Puebla facility until 2003, and the later editions were exclusively produced in Puebla.

The factory in Puebla has been producing cars for more than 60 years and is a worldwide export hub for VW's vehicles. Once it stops producing the Beetle, it will turn to producing a new compact SUV that will be positioned below the company's Tiguan model.

While production of the Beetle is ending, don't think the nostalgia is over. Volkswagen has plans to launch a new version of its classic VW bus in 2022 — this time, it's electric.

And in this era when most anything can be rebooted, VW didn't close the door forever on the Beetle.

"[T]here are no immediate plans to replace it," Volkswagen Group of America's then-President and CEO Hinrich Woebcken said last year. "I would also say, 'Never say never.' "


Last ever VW Beetle model rolls off Mexican production line

A Volkswagen "Beetle", the final edition of the iconic car, is pictured inside the factory in Puebla, Puebla State, Mexico, on July 10, 2019

German auto giant Volkswagen launched the final edition of its iconic "Beetle" car from its Mexican factory on Wednesday at a ceremony accompanied by a Mariachi band.

The bug-shaped sedan rolled off the production line to rapturous applause, the last iteration of a model first manufactured in the late 1930s in Germany and 1954 in Puebla, central Mexico.

"The loss of the Beetle after three generations and almost seven decades should provoke a wide variety of emotions," said Steffen Reiche, the CEO of Volkswagen Mexico.

The limited, 65-unit run of the "Beetle Final Edition" will be sold in Mexico on the internet for a base price of $21,000 per vehicle, and can be reserved with a $1,000 payment.

Each car includes a commemorative plaque on its left side, numbered from one to 65.

It will be available in metallic blue, black, white and beige.

Dozens of factory workers had turned up from early morning to put the final touches on the car, which was unveiled after seven hours of work.

The employees wore bright yellow tops bearing the words: Thanks Beetle, as the unveiling proceeded in a festive atmosphere tinged with nostalgia for a car that has generated a loyal following like almost no other.

A final edition (right) of the Volkswagen "Beetle" is seen next to a last edition of a previous model of the iconic car, at a factory in Puebla, Puebla State, Mexico, on July 10, 2019

"Who couldn't want a car like this, made with Mexican hands?" said Roberto Benitez, a 40-year-old production technician.

"It's always sad, you feel like part of one. That's the daily work, full shifts to get the best results, it makes me proud," added Francisco Bueno, a 25-year-old employee.

The production of the final Beetle model was announced last September by Volkswagen, still trying to turn the page after the costly 2015 "dieselgate" scandal in which it paid out huge government settlements after rigging 11 million cars to cheat regulatory emissions tests.

The vehicle's history goes back to the Nazi era, having first been developed by Ferdinand Porsche with support from Adolf Hitler, who in 1937 formed the state-run Volkswagenwerk, or "The People's Car Company."

Graphic on selected Volkswagen "Beetle" models.

After the war, the Allied countries made Volkswagen a priority in an effort to revive the German auto industry.

The advertising agency Doyle Dane Bernbach in 1959 rechristened the car the "Beetle," and began touting its small size as an advantage to consumers, according to the History Channel.

The car attained further popularity with the 1968 Disney movie "The Love Bug," the story of a racing Volkswagen with a mind of its own.

Andy Warhol did prints featuring the car while a Beetle featured prominently on the cover of "Abbey Road," the final studio album by the Beatles.

The current "New Beetle" model, first launched in 1997, is a far cry from the original that ceased production in 2003, but it retains the distinctive bug-shape and large headlights that appear like eyes on a smiling face.

Volkswagen employees pose with a "Beetle", the final edition of the iconic car, at a factory in Puebla, Puebla State, Mexico, on July 10, 2019

Robust, easy to maintain and high-performance, it reached its apogee in the 1960s and 70s before its popularity waned and Volkswagen ceased European production in 1978.

Eventually its high fuel usage, weak brakes and poor handling led to it being overtaken by the competition, not least VW's own "Golf" model.


The Last VW Beetle Rolls Off The Assembly Line In Mexico This Week

It's the end of an era — an era that has stretched on for a very long time, albeit with slightly different silhouettes.

The last Volkswagen Beetle, a third-generation Denim Blue coupe, will be produced in Puebla, Mexico, on Wednesday.

"It's impossible to imagine where Volkswagen would be without the Beetle," said Scott Keogh, president and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America. "While its time has come, the role it has played in the evolution of our brand will be forever cherished."

An emblem of the hippie era in America, the car was marketed in the U.S. as adorably uncool. Volkswagen promoted the Beetle with cheeky advertising campaigns using slogans like "Live below your means" and "It's ugly, but it gets you there." In 1969, one of the vehicles cost $1,799.

Perhaps that image — and its good value — helped the auto to overcome a not-proud history: Volkswagen was founded as a project of Adolf Hitler, and its earliest cars were used for both civilian and military purposes. Volkswagen was relaunched by British authorities after World War II, and its car was rebranded as the Beetle to distance it from its Nazi heritage.

It worked. A couple decades later, the car was the anthropomorphized star of a run of movies starting with The Love Bug and on to Herbie Fully Loaded.

Volkswagen launched the New Beetle in the 1998 model year, aiming for whimsy with a built-in flower vase. It found initial success, with 80,000 sold in the U.S. in 1999.

The automaker revamped the Beetle again for 2012, but sales sputtered as time went on and SUVs became popular in the U.S. As Volkswagen writes in a love letter to its most famous creation: "Cult is not necessarily synonymous with sales. . The Beetle has not been able to attain the global success of the new 'Volkswagen,' the Golf."

The current Beetle starts at $20,895 and comes in a sporty convertible model, too. Both are ending production on Friday.

The Beetle hasn't been produced in Germany since the 1970s. But production of the original Beetle continued at the Puebla facility until 2003, and the later editions were exclusively produced in Puebla.

The factory in Puebla has been producing cars for more than 60 years and is a worldwide export hub for VW's vehicles. Once it stops producing the Beetle, it will turn to producing a new compact SUV that will be positioned below the company's Tiguan model.

While production of the Beetle is ending, don't think the nostalgia is over. Volkswagen has plans to launch a new version of its classic VW bus in 2022 — this time, it's electric.

And in this era when most anything can be rebooted, VW didn't close the door forever on the Beetle.

"[T]here are no immediate plans to replace it," Volkswagen Group of America's then-President and CEO Hinrich Woebcken said last year. "I would also say, 'Never say never.' "


Bye, bye Bug: Final Volkswagen Beetle rolls off assembly line after eight decades

FRANKFURT, Germany — Volkswagen is halting production of the last version of its Beetle model this week at its plant in Puebla, Mexico. It's the end of the road for a vehicle that has symbolized many things over a history spanning eight decades since 1938.

It has been: a part of Germany's darkest hours as a never-realized Nazi prestige project. A symbol of Germany's postwar economic renaissance and rising middle-class prosperity. An example of globalization, sold and recognized all over the world. An emblem of the 1960s counterculture in the United States. Above all, the car remains a landmark in design, as recognizable as the Coca-Cola bottle.

The car's original design — a rounded silhouette with seating for four or five, nearly vertical windshield and the air-cooled engine in the rear — can be traced back to Austrian engineer Ferdinand Porsche, who was hired to fulfill Adolf Hitler's project for a "people's car" that would spread auto ownership the way the Ford Model T had in the U.S.

FILE - In this May 26, 1938 file photo, German Nazi leader Adolf Hitler speaks at the opening ceremony of the Volkswagen car factory in Fallersleben, Lower Saxony, Germany. Volkswagen is halting production of the last version of its Beetle model in July 2019 at its plant in Puebla, Mexico, the end of the road for a vehicle that has symbolized many things over a history spanning eight decades since 1938. (Photo: AP)

Aspects of the car bore similarities to the Tatra T97, made in Czechoslovakia in 1937, and to sketches by Hungarian engineer Bela Barenyi published in 1934. Mass production of what was called the KdF-Wagen, based on the acronym of the Nazi labor organization under whose auspices it was to be sold, was cancelled due to World War II.

Instead, the massive new plant in what was then countryside east of Hanover turned out military vehicles, using forced laborers from all over Europe under miserable conditions.

Re-launched as a civilian carmaker under supervision of the British occupation authorities, the Volkswagen factory was transferred in 1949 to the Germany government and the state of Lower Saxony, which still owns part of the company. By 1955, the millionth Beetle — officially called the Type 1 — had rolled off the assembly line in what was now the town of Wolfsburg.

The United States became Volkswagen's most important foreign market, peaking at 563,522 cars in 1968, or 40% of production. Unconventional, sometimes humorous advertising from agency Doyle Dane Bernbach urged car buyers to "Think small."

"Unlike in West Germany, where its low price, quality and durability stood for a new postwar normality, in the United States the Beetle's characteristics lent it a profoundly unconventional air in a car culture dominated by size and showmanship," wrote Bernhard Rieger in his 2013 history, "The People's Car."

Photo taken July 10, 2016 in River Edge, NJ at the River Edge Cultural Center's 15th annual car show. Here, a pair of VW Beetles are on display. (Photo: Carmine Galasso/NorthJersey.com file)

Production at Wolfsburg ended in 1978 as newer front drive models like the Golf took over. But the Beetle wasn't dead yet. Production went on in Mexico from 1967 until 2003 — longer than the car had been made in Germany. Nicknamed the "vochito," the car made itself at home as a rugged, Mexican-made "carro del pueblo."

The New Beetle — a completely retro version build on a modified Golf platform — resurrected some of the old Beetle's cute, unconventional aura in 1998 under CEO Ferdinand Piech, Ferdinand Porsche's grandson. In 2012, the Beetle's design was made a bit sleeker.

The end of the Beetle comes at a turning point for Volkswagen as it rebounds from a scandal over cars rigged to cheat on diesel emissions tests. The company is gearing up for mass production of the battery-driven compact ID.3, a car that the company predicts will have an impact like that of the Beetle and the Golf by bringing electric mobility to a mass market.

The last of 5,961 Final Edition versions of the Beetle is headed for a museum after ceremonies in Puebla on July 10 to mark the end of production.


Buggin’ out: Last ever Volkswagen Beetle rolls off Mexican production line

The Volkswagen factory in Puebla was the only one left in the world making the original Beetle cars and more recently the only one making the modern version.

The limited, 65-unit run of the &lsquoBeetle Final Edition&rsquo will be sold in Mexico on the internet for a base price of $21,000 per vehicle. It can be reserved with a $1,000 payment.

Each car includes a commemorative plaque on its left side, numbered from one to 65. The bug-shaped sedan cars are available in metallic blue, black, white, and beige.

&ldquoThe loss of the Beetle after three generations and almost seven decades should provoke a wide variety of emotions,&rdquo Volkswagen Mexico CEO Steffen Reiche said.

The factory employees who turned up in the early morning to put the final touches on the car wore bright yellow tops bearing the words: &ldquoThanks Beetle.&rdquo The unveiling of the car proceeded in a festive atmosphere.

&ldquoWho couldn&rsquot want a car like this, made with Mexican hands?&rdquo 40-year-old production technician Roberto Benitez told AP.

&ldquoIt&rsquos always sad, you feel like part of one. That&rsquos the daily work, full shifts to get the best results, it makes me proud,&rdquo Francisco Bueno, a 25-year-old employee, added.

Last year, the German automaker announced it will stop making its iconic Beetle car, which first rolled off the production lines in 1938. The carmaker said it will focus on more popular areas such as SUVs and electric vehicles.

In 1979, the company stopped selling the car in the US but continued production in Mexico and Brazil. Volkswagen revived the model in 1998, introducing a redesigned modern &lsquoNew Beetle&rsquo, which mainly attracted female buyers.

Sales of Beetles dramatically fell from more than 420,000 units sold at the peak of their popularity in the late 1960s. In 2017, Volkswagen sold roughly 15,000 Beetles in the US.

For more stories on economy & finance visit RT's business section


Final VW Beetle rolls off the line

A fter eight decades, more than 23 million units, and countless derivatives, the final Volkswagen Beetle will roll off the production line in Mexico this week.

Very few, if any, other cars can claim a history as colourful, or a tapestry richer than the Beetle’s, and perhaps no other single vehicle eptimises the term 'iconic' more accurately or deservedly than the beloved Bug.

With slowing global sales, the writing had been on the Beetle’s garage wall for some time, particularly in Australia where sales of the model ceased in 2016. But its demise is equally as a result of funds reallocation following the diesel emissions scandal and a massive investment in clean electrification. Along with other low-volume nice-to-have models including the Scirocco, the Beetle had to go.

Production at the Puebla plant in Mexico has continued to supply regions with more significant volumes ahead of last orders, but its lines will now gear up for other models, while continuing with the current Golf, Jetta and Tiguan Allspace.

Over its octogenarian life, the Beetle has been built in six of Volkswagen’s factories around the world.

Born in 1938, the original Beetle, or Type 1 as it was officially known, was conceived by Adolf Hitler who dreamt of a car that everyone could own. Indeed, Volkswagen translates to ‘people’s car’ and his vision worked spectacularly well.

Such was the success of model thanks to an approachable price, reliable mechanics and unrivalled practicality for the time, it went on to sell more than 21.5 million units worldwide, and is symbolic of Germany’s post-war economic renaissance.

Over its life it developed a cult following winning notable favour with the hippie communities from the 1960s and the love affair continues to this day. The model was immortalised in the Walt Disney motion picture The Love Bug as Herbie, and featured in other blockbusters including Transformers and Austin Powers. Even Barbie had one.

A nitro funny car based in the UK that wears a Beetle shell claims to be the world’s fastest, cracking a maximum speed of 540km/h and geting there in just 6.0 seconds a diesel-powered Beetle once entered the Dakar rally and one was even converted to be able to both float on water and underneath a hot-air balloon. The Beetle really has done it all.

In 1997, Volkswagen launched a retro ‘revival’ of the original - even though the traditional Beetle would still continue to be produced in some countries until 2003 - and the so-called New Beetle based on Mk4 Golf mechanicals went on to add another 1.7 million sales to the tally.

There was an update to the modern version in 2011 along with a number of special edition versions that ranged from sticker packs to more substantial versions including the sand-conquering Dune.

With the overlap in production from Type 1 to New Beetle, the model can claim the title as longest running continuous nameplate with more than 80 years under its belt, but despite its remarkable sales figures it is not the most popular car to date. That honour falls to the Toyota Corolla, which despite commencing manufacturing many years after the Beetle in the mid 1960s, has sold well over 45 million.

Sadly and ironically, the car that truly established Volkswagen as the peoples brand with mammoth sales is now being put out to pasture for dwindling interest, but it’s not the end of VWs with retro appeal.

As part of the company’s strategy to introduce electrified vehicles, a zero-emissions version of the I.D. Buzz concept is on the way, reviving the equally loved VW van and camper.

Amusingly, the Volkswagen Beetle is still used as a colloquial measurement of weight even though its mass has varied between 800kg and 1300kg over its lifespan. Whatever are we to use as a convenient illustration now?


VW Says Final Goodbye to Beetle with Touching Tribute Ad

The video will air during New Year's Eve countdown coverage and can also be watched on YouTube.

  • Volkswagen says its final goodbye to the Beetle with a touching tribute video to air on New Year's Eve 2019.
  • The iconic Bug started life way back in 1938 and continued through 2019 thanks to modernized successors such as 1998's New Beetle.
  • Electric vehicles will be the wave of the future for the German company with an EV SUV launching in 2020.

As the clock counts down to midnight on the last day of 2019, millions of Americans will be preparing their New Year resolutions or looking forward to a fresh start for the 2020 calendar year. Joining them will be Volkswagen, which is celebrating the end of a very important era by saying a final goodbye to the Beetle, its most iconic product.

In an emotional animated video, the Bug's journey through the decades is honored while the Pro Musica Youth Chorus delivers its rendition of the classic Beatles song "Let it Be." If you have any sort of connection to the Beetle&ndashand most of us do, including this writer, who piloted a red 30-year-old Bug in high school and college&mdashthe ad is sure to evoke an emotional reaction of some sort.

Celebrity cameos include Kevin Bacon, Andy Cohen, and Andy Warhol. Warhol's inclusion here is a clear tribute to the artist who famously used the Volkswagen's advertising in his artwork. Bacon's character in the 1980s film classic Footloose drove a yellow Beetle from the early 1970s, and Bravo TV host Cohen is a known Beetle fanatic, shown below posing with his son Ben and a bright-orange VW.

The Volkswagen Type 1, which was the car's official model name, first entered production all the way back in 1938, but due to World War II, the first deliveries of cars didn't happen until 1947. Importation to the United States started in 1950 but the small German coupe was slow to catch on with American consumers, who preferred chrome-laden Detroit-built lead sleds. The 1960s were more lucrative for the Beetle, thanks in no small part to brilliant marketing campaigns, more powerful engines, Southern California dune buggy culture, and a starring role alongside Dean Jones as Herbie the Love Bug.

Throughout the 1970s, more improvements kept Beetle sales going and a mild redesign and a new name&ndashSuper Beetle&ndashputs the car on pace to break the Ford Model T's record for most cars produced. By 1979, though, Americans have moved on from the air-cooled two-door to more modern economy cars such as Volkswagen's own Golf, and the last Beetle is sold in the United States. Production continued on in Mexico and Brazil for global markets until 2003.

In 1998, Volkswagen launches the New Beetle and hopes to capitalize on nostalgia for the old Bug by offering a curvaceously styled retromobile with a modern powertrain and contemporary features. Although sales were strong at first, the New Beetle failed to strike the same chord with buyers as the original and was redesigned in 2012 to be less cute and more masculine, but ultimately goes out of production in 2019.

By celebrating the end of the road for the Beetle, Volkswagen is wiping the slate clean&mdashsomething the German company has been trying to do since it was caught cheating on EPA emissions testing for its diesel engines in 2014&mdashto help focus on an electric future. At the end of the video, a teaser for an upcoming ID. electric vehicle is shown. Volkswagen has been showing EV concept after EV concept at auto shows for the past few years, and it appears as though the company is gearing up for production of an electric SUV in 2020.


Watch the video: SLEEPER BUG: 517 HP Subaru-Powered 1973 VW Super Beetle. Nicole Johnsons Detour EP1 (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hackett

    Congratulations your idea is brilliant

  2. Doulkis

    Well, then what?

  3. Val

    In my opinion, mistakes are made.

  4. Misu

    It is agreeable, this very good thought has to be precisely on purpose

  5. Alastair

    In my opinion, you are wrong. I'm sure. Let's discuss this. Email me at PM.

  6. Antar

    Eh: What can I say? The author, as always, is on top. Respect! I liked everything, especially the beginning. Smiled. Of course, there are now critics who will say that this does not happen, that this is all invented, and so on. But I read it with pleasure, and my friends read it - everyone is delighted.



Write a message