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Would an illegitimate child of a monarch have been recognized at the Russian court?

Would an illegitimate child of a monarch have been recognized at the Russian court?


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For purposes of a novel I am writing I would like to know if an illegitimate son or daughter of a 19th century Russian tsar would have been recognized by the court. Would it matter if the birth was before or after the tsar's coronation?


The term they used was "Royal Bastard" referring to an illegitimate child of a reigning monarch. How they were treated, "recognized by court", was entirely up to the ruling monarch.

Royal Bastards of Russian Monarchs include:

  • Count Alexei Grigorievich Bobrinsky, of Catherine the Great
  • Joséphine Koberwein of tzar Nicholas II of Russia
  • Nikolai Lukash tsar Alexander I of Russia
  • Sofia Sergeyevna Trubetskaya either Prince Trubetskoy, or tsar Nicholas I of Russia.

Other Notable royal bastards in history but not from Russia include:

  • Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Richmond, son of King Henry VIII of England,
  • James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, son of Charles II.

I Also found this link listing general illegitimate children of monarchs.


Watch the video: How Queen Victorias Grandson Became Hitlers Favourite. Absolute History (May 2022).


Comments:

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